Interdisciplinary Dentistry

Interdisciplinary Dentistry

You’ve probably heard the saying, “Jack of all trades”; maybe you didn’t know that the rest of that phrase is “ . . . master of none”.  The theory behind this phrase is that a person can be competent in many tasks, but is usually limited to excellence in just a few.  At our dental centers in Freeman, Parkston, and Viborg, we believe that this phrase applies to dentistry.  Because our goal is for each patient to receive excellent care in every realm, we cooperate with medical and dental specialists to accomplish interdisciplinary dentistry. 

We understand that, as a patient, it is more convenient to have all of your dental care performed in one location.  However, when it comes to a choice between convenience and excellence, we will always choose excellence.  When Dr. Jason, Dr. Alex and Dr. Serena create a customized treatment plan for their patients, they considers what type of practitioner will best perform each individual procedure.  These decisions are made on a case-by-case basis, much like a primary care physician may treat a case of high blood pressure in his or her office, but refer out a complicated cardiovascular issue to a cardiologist.

Dental Specialties

The American Dental Association recognizes nine dental specialties in dentistry.  These specialties are characterized by residency programs, which add several years to their education, and certifying boards, which recognize their limitation of practice to a specific specialty.  The nine recognized dental specialties are:

  1. Dental Public Health – promotion of oral health and disease prevention

  2. Endodontics – root canals and surgeries related to infections originating within the tooth

  3. Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology – diagnosis of abnormal lesions and diseases of the oral cavity

  4. Oral & Maxillofacial Radiology – interpretation of images of the head & neck complex, including x-rays and cone beam computed tomography

  5. Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery – surgical intervention ranging from simple extraction of teeth to complex realignment of the upper and lower jaws

  6. Orthodontics – realignment of teeth and bite relationships

  7. Pediatric Dentistry – dentistry for children

  8. Periodontics – treatment of diseases and conditions of the supporting structures of the teeth: bones, ligaments, and gum tissue

  9. Prosthodontics – restoration of missing tooth and jaw structures

Many people are surprised to learn that there are currently no recognized specialties for TMJ, cosmetic dentistry, and dental implants.  Advertising claims can be misleading in these areas. 

Why Do Some Dentists Pull Wisdom Teeth, Place Implants or Do Root Canals?

Many general dentists have practiced long enough to determine which procedures they are able to perform with excellence, rather than just being competent.  They will spend more time in continuing education learning the procedures that they love, and will consistently improve their skill in specific techniques.  This is why some general dentists are able to provide excellent treatment in areas another general dentist would refer to a specialist.

On the other hand, you may find that a dentist who used to do root canals in his office no longer does.  It is likely that this dentist has found he is not able to efficiently provide the very best root canal for his patients, and they will receive a more positive long-term success rate by seeing an endodontist for that specific procedure. 

Medical Specialists

As we discussed in a previous blog on how oral health affects your overall health, there are many connections between the mouth and the rest of the body.  As we continue to gather more information about your head & neck with the 3D imaging and continued learning in dentistry, we are better able to recognize these connections and advise you to see the appropriate medical specialist.

The Importance of the General Dentist

In cases where interdisciplinary dentistry is necessary, the general dentist plays an important role.  In addition to performing certain procedures in the care of the patient, the general dentist is instrumental in organizing and coordinating the flow of communication and treatment among the various specialists.  

If you have a complicated dental history and think you need interdisciplinary dentistry, call our office at 605-925-4999 (Freeman) or (605) 928-3363 (Parkston) to schedule your appointment today with Dr. Jason Aanenson, Dr. Alex Whitesell or Dr. Serena Whitesell! Their commitment to excellent care will ensure you see the proper doctor for each individual procedure your treatment requires.

Hormone-Induced Gingivitis

Hormone-Induced Gingivitis

What is hormone-induced gingivitis?

Hormone-induced gingivitis is a type of gingivitis that occurs specifically during changes in hormonal levels .  It is a very common condition that we see frequently in our office.  Hormone-induced gingivitis causes a patient to have gums that are swollen, red, tender, and bleed easily.   The tenderness and bleeding often make oral hygiene routines uncomfortable, and patients sometimes avoid proper brushing and flossing techniques because it hurts.  Healthy, natural gum tissues are light pink, relatively flat and tightly adhered to the teeth.  The appearance of bright red, puffy gums is unsightly, giving a diseased look to the mouth, and may cause embarrassment. 

What causes hormone-induced gingivitis?  

The name says it all: it is induced by hormones.  Rapid swings in hormone levels (most notably estrogen, progesterone, and chorionic gonadotropin) can have a profound effect on gum tissues.  Research has shown that these hormone levels cause two important changes to occur:

  1. Hormone changes affect the tiny blood vessels in the gum tissue, increasing the blood flow in this area (which can cause swelling) and changing the permeability of the blood vessels (which makes the tissue bleed more easily).

  2. Hormone changes also affect the types of bacteria present in gum tissues. Research shows that gum tissues in patients with hormone changes such as pregnancy or taking birth control pills have more dangerous bacteria than patients without hormone changes. By “more dangerous”, we mean stronger and more likely to cause gum disease.


Who is at risk for hormone-induced gingivitis?  

Hormone-induced gingivitis is common in children going through puberty, both girls and boys.  It is also prevalent in women at various stages of hormone changes, including menstrual cycles, the use of birth control pills, pregnancy, and menopause.  This higher risk for gum disease makes oral hygiene even more important than it already is.  People with poor oral hygiene are more likely to experience hormone-induced gingivitis than those with good plaque control and consistent oral hygiene habits.  People who have infrequent and inconsistent dental cleanings are also at an increased risk.

 

What can you do about hormone-induced gingivitis?

 

  • Practice perfect oral hygiene. Do not miss a single day of flossing! Use an electric toothbrush; they are shown to effectively remove more plaque than a manual toothbrush.

  • Add a mouthwash to your oral hygiene routine, and use it twice daily. In addition to an over-the-counter alcohol-free mouthwash, you can swish with warm salt water throughout the day. Some patients require a prescription mouthwash to get the inflammation under control.

  • Stay on schedule with professional dental cleanings. Your dental hygienist is able to remove bacterial buildup from areas you might be missing, even with good oral hygiene.

  • Consider increasing the frequency of professional dental cleanings. Many of our patients with severe gingivitis during puberty or pregnancy have their teeth cleaned every 3 months, instead of every 6 months. This reduces the severity of gingivitis by reducing the amount of bacterial buildup accumulated between cleanings.

  • Talk to Dr. Jason, Dr. Alex or Dr. Serena about other recommendations they may have to improve your gingivitis. There are many additional oral hygiene products available to help reduce gum inflammation. They will determine which one will be most beneficial for your unique situation.

 

Think you or your child may have hormone-induced gingivitis?

Call our office at 605-925-4999 (Freeman) or (605) 928-3363 (Parkston) to schedule your appointment today with Dr. Jason Aanenson, Dr. Alex Whitesell or Dr. Serena Whitesell!

Periodontal Disease: What Does it Mean to be High Risk?

Periodontal disease: What does it mean to be high risk?

What is periodontal disease? 

Periodontal disease is a disease that affects the structures supporting the teeth, including both the gums and the jawbone.  Its primary cause is bacterial buildup on the teeth, and some people have a higher risk due to genetic factors, systemic disorders (such as diabetes), and habits (such as smoking or oral tobacco use). 

What are the stages of periodontal disease?

The earliest stage of periodontal disease is called gingivitis, which means inflammation of the gums.  Inflammation can involve one or more of the following:

  • A bright red color to the gums

  • Swollen or puffy gums

  • Gums that bleed easily when brushing, flossing or having teeth professionally cleaned

 How does periodontal disease happen?

Periodontal disease begins with the accumulation of bacteria and plaque on the teeth.  This can be due to poor oral hygiene, and it can also be due to the presence of very difficult-to-clean areas on your teeth.  When teeth are crooked or rotated, they collect more bacteria.  We all have different types of bacteria in our mouths, and some types are more destructive than others, meaning they are more likely to cause disease.  Research studies show that the types of bacteria that gather on crooked teeth are more likely to cause periodontal disease than the types of bacteria that collect on straight teeth.  Periodontal disease progresses as the bacteria and plaque harden on the teeth into tartar, which can only be removed with a professional cleaning.  If no professional dental care is completed, the tartar accumulation will grow, causing more inflammation and more serious damage to the gum and bone.  In severe periodontal disease, the supporting structures have become so damaged that they can no longer hold the teeth, which become loose and have to be extracted.

What does it mean if I am high risk?

If, during your evaluation, you presented with some signs of gingivitis, you would be classified as high risk for periodontal disease.  As stated earlier, gingivitis is the first step to periodontal disease, and if left untreated, it can lead to a progression of disease.  The good news is that in the early stages, periodontal disease is completely reversible!

Risk factors noted during a clinical evaluation:

  • Pockets measuring ›3mm

  • Poor oral hygiene

  • Crowded teeth

  • Prior periodontal disease

  • Bone loss

  • Mobility (loose teeth)

  • Gum recession

  • Mucogingival defect (gum tissue that is not attached to the bone underneath it)

  • Abnormal frenum attachments

What can I do about it?

  1. Have a professional dental cleaning. This removes the bacterial accumulation from the teeth, essentially giving you a “clean slate”.

  2. Change your oral hygiene routine as directed by your dentist or hygienist. This may involve different toothbrushing techniques, an electric toothbrush, consistent flossing, interdental brushes, etc . . .

  3. If prescribed by your dentist, begin an antibiotic mouthrinse daily. The more bacteria you kill, the less there are to accumulate on your teeth.

  4. Return for a follow-up professional cleaning in 6-8 weeks. This allows us to assess the home care, suggest any positive changes to be made, and again remove bacteria that have accumulated.

What if I don’t do anything?

Without treatment, bacterial levels will increase, causing more accumulation of plaque and tartar.  More plaque and tartar causes more inflammation and response from the gums and bone.  As the bone migrates away from the tartar buildup, which it considers a foreign substance, the support for the teeth is slowly lost.  In a worst case scenario, untreated periodontal disease eventually leads to loss of all teeth and loss of the underlying jawbone, which makes future treatment with either dentures or dental implants less predictable.

Need more information?

Call our office at 605-925-4999 (Freeman) or (605) 928-3363 (Parkston) to schedule your appointment today with Dr. Jason Aanenson, Dr. Alex Whitesell or Dr. Serena Whitesell!